Whether you’re traveling with friends or joined a group tour, you’ll remember your trip long after saying goodbye at the airport. For many travelers, preserving these memories with photos is important. When group photos are on one phone, selfies on another, and the best shots of landmarks on a memory card or two, gathering photos from the entire group is a challenge. Photo sharing apps and websites make sharing travel images privately much easier. There are many ways to collect photos from friends and family after a trip, each with pros and cons.

  • 23snaps: Originally created for parents sharing photos of their kids with distant relatives, 23snaps is an easy-to-use private platform that calls itself a “digital journal.”
  • Amazon Photos: Anyone with an Amazon Prime membership also has access to 5G of full-resolution storage on Amazon Photos. The Groups feature lets you share photos among as many as 50 travel buddies.
  • Apple Photos: If everyone in your group is uses iOS, share pictures with Apple Photos. This app does a great job of sorting photos so you can find what you’re looking for later.
  • Canon Irista: Because this site is managed by camera brand Canon, it prioritizes keeping your photos at their full resolution. Collaborative albums and the ability to upload from both your devices and social media make this a good travel option.
  • Cluster: Cluster was built specifically for group photo sharing, so it has a lot of the features you’ll want for collecting photos from your friends or family. 
  • Dropbox: Lots of your travel mates are probably already using Dropbox, so it may be a convenient option for sharing images. Dropbox Basic only includes 2 GB of storage, which you’ll fill quickly with high-quality photos.
  • dropevent.com: This photo sharing service is designed for organized events, so it prioritizes advanced features like restricting downloads, moderating which photos are added and contact form options. This may be too many details to worry about or just what you’re looking for.
  • eFamily: The photo sharing, organized albums and newsletter feature on eFamily are meant for keeping up with family. Busy travelers who want to remember every detail of their group vacation will also enjoy these features.
  • Facebook: If losing resolution on your photos isn’t a problem, Facebook is the easiest way to collect photos from a group. Use a collaborative album set to private and upload away.
  • Family Album: Family Album prioritizes engagement with uploaded photos. You can comment on individual photos and see who looked at your images. There’s also a video feature that sews together your uploads into quick “movies.”
  • Flickr: You may not know Flickr for private photo sharing, but it is possible.
  • Google Drive: Share folders and files with fellow travelers via email or link. Google Drive is one of the simplest solutions to the problem of group photo sharing.
  • Google Photos: Google Photos is very similar to Apple Photos with one exception: there are Android and iOS apps.
  • The Guest: Wedding planning website The Knot built The Guest to help couples collect photos from their wedding guests. It works for travel groups too, as long as you’re all using your phones’ cameras. The potential downside is that during the time you specify, all photos are shared with the group unless you pause the feature.
  • Lifebox: This photo sharing website and app is straightforward, offering sharable albums friends can contribute to with unlimited storage.
  • OneDrive: Microsoft users have access to OneDrive’s cloud storage. Share photos using a link, similar to Google Drive.
  • Pasteboard: The simple interface on Pasteboard might be just what you’re looking for.
  • Photobucket: Follow other members of your groups on Photobucket to see their uploads. You can password protect albums so only the people you want to see your photos can.
  • Photocircle: At this time, Photocircle is only available via the Apple and Android apps. Add different members to each of your albums and upload as many photos as you want.
  • Shutterfly: If you’re already using Shutterfly to order prints of your photos, it might make sense to use the platform’s Share Sites for photo sharing. The biggest con is the inability to download full resolution images once you’ve uploaded them.
  • SmugMug: SmugMug primarily functions as a photography portfolio but also offers sharing functionality for “Memory Makers.” The aesthetically pleasing layout may be worth the small monthly charge for serious travelers.
  • Yogile: Your fellow travelers can contribute to your albums via app or website using Yogile. They focus on making the platform easy to use, which is great for on-the-go photo sharing. To store your photos long-term, you’ll need to upgrade to a paid account.
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